The Seven Cities of Gold [C64]

7cities_boxI love exploration games. Games where you depart for the unknown, explore terra incognita and discover new civilisations. And that brings us to The Seven Cities of Gold, a game developed by Ozark Softscape and published by Ariolasoft (EU) / Electronic Arts (NA) in 1984.

And this is the game that inspired a certain Sid Meier to work on a title called Pirates. In fact, Seven Cities was well ahead of its time and even today, 30 years after its release, it’s still a blast to play (assuming you are into that genre).

Set sail. Explore. Discover.

Ready for departure (click to enlarge)

Ready for departure (click to enlarge)

The goal of the game is to set sail for the New World, send expeditions inland and build settlements, while trading with the indigenous people or, if things turn bad, fight them. The game itself is open ended and you are free to decide what to do. Another big plus is the option to randomise or create your own world, which adds immensely to its replay value.

A new day

The sun is rising on a day full of promise for the future. History waits to be made. Its shape is in your grasp.

7cities_016

Land Ho! (click to enlarge)

After leaving Europe the player finds himself in the middle of the Atlantic and has to guide his expedition westwards. Upon arriving in the New World the player is free to do however he pleases. Should I make landfall and send a party inland, or should I sail along the coast? Perhaps I should build a fort. Decisions, decisions.

If the player decides to visit one of the villages he can drop gifts to calm down hostile tribesmen and should look out for the tribal chief, with whom the player can then trade goods. But not all tribes will welcome the expedition with open arms and will outright attack the player. And then there’s only two options: Retreat of fight.

I recorded the following video to demonstrate the general gameplay. Now, I haven’t played that game in ages and made numerous mistakes, including aimlessly walking around and wasting food. Seriously, if I would have been in charge of a real expedition it most likely would’ve ended in disaster.

The Spanish Crown is pleased

Well, not just them. Me, too! Even after three decades the game hasn’t lost any of its appeal. Yes, graphics and sound seem to be from the last ice age compared to modern games. But it’s all about the gameplay, something I often miss in todays games. But if you will excuse me for now, I have to go back to the game and lead another expedition to doom and failure fame and fortune.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The Seven Cities of Gold [C64]

  1. One of my all time favorites! I still recall the exhilaration I’d feel at discovering and then exploring a new continent. It was the first time I ever played a game and actually was immersed. Through emulators, I’ve re-visited a number of old C64 favorites over the years, but never this one or Ultima IV (another favorite) – I was always a bit worried that neither would stand the test of time, and that I’d shatter some my amazing memories of playing them.

    • Trust me, I know where you’re coming from, I’m basically worried every time I revisit those games before I start a post. So far I was lucky, and in one instance, surprised (Test Drive).

      And regarding Seven Cities of Gold, I’ve never been the best explorer, but always had a good time, unlike my poor colonists. Every time I went back to one of my settlements, they all vanished. 🙄

  2. Pingback: Influential Gaming Moments: Seven Cities of Gold | Stir Fried Pixels

  3. Pingback: Seven Cities of Gold Revisited | The Retro Years

Leave a comment [no email address required]

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s